Healing And Warm – Clove Leaf Oil

Clove itself is the best known old cure for innumerbale diseases. The problems that have mainly to do with infections are best deat with this clove leaf oil. The oil has many properties that differentiate it from rest of the essential oils.

The clove is an evergreen tree, called Eugenia arena, reaching a height of 15 to 30 feet tall. It is native to the Spice Islands and the Philippines but also grown in India, Sumatra, Jamaica, the West Indies, Brazil, and other tropical areas.

The bark is pale yellowish gray in color and smooth. It has opposite ovate (egg-shaped) leaves 3-6 inches long. Its flowers, are red and white, bell-shaped, and grow in clusters. The flowers when gathered are at first of a reddish color, but on drying they assume a deep brown cast. The familiar clove used in the kitchen is the dried flower bud.

During the Han dynasty (207 B. C. to 220 A. D.) those who addressed the Chinese emperor were required to hold cloves in their mouths to mask bad breath. Traditional Chinese physicians have long used the herb to treat -

  • Indigestion
  • Diarrhoea
  • Hernia
  • Ringworm
  • Athlete’s foot
  • Stimulant for the nerves

European doctors once breathed through clove-filled leather beaks to ward off the plague.

India’s traditional Ayurvedic healers have used clove since ancient times to treat respiratory and digestive ailments. In tropical Asia cloves have been given to treat such diverse infections as malaria, cholera and tuberculosis, as well as scabies.

Clove first arrived in Europe around the 4th century A.D. as a highly coveted luxury. The medieval German herbalists used cloves as part of anti-gout mixture. Once clove became easily available in Europe, it was prized as a treatment for indigestion, flatulence, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. It was also used to treat cough, infertility, warts, worms, wounds, and toothache. European hospitals use clove to treat viral hepatitis, bacterial colitis, hypertension, thyroid dysfunction, and fatigue.

Early American Eclectic physicians used clove to treat digestive complaints and added it to bitter herb-medicine preparations to make them more palatable. They were also the first to extract clove oil from the herbal buds. They used it on the gums to relieve toothache.

Traditional uses in America include treating worms, viruses, candida, and various bacterial and protozoan infections. Clove is also used for toothaches, bad breath, dizziness, cough, earache, colitis, epilepsy, palsy, and digestive upsets, as a sleep-inducer, anti-inflammatory, blood-thinner, mental stimulant, etc.

Have a look at our reference links -

  1. Clove Oil by Organic Health
  2. Cloves by ehow
  3. Clove by Medicine