Clove Leaf Oil – Anti Infectious

I am pretty sure, there isn’t a single detail you don’t know about clove. Yet, the more you read, the more you explore, so here’s another informative piece for you on clove leaf oil.

Clove is the dried unopened flower bud obtained from a handsome, middle-sized, evergreen tree. The tree has a straight trunk and grows upto a height of 10 to 12 meters.

The dove has been used in India and China , for over 2,000 years, as a spice to check both tooth decay and counter halitosis that is bad breath. In Persia and China, it was considered to have aphrodisiac properties.

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The clove tree is a native of the Molucca islands. The Chinese obtained this spice by the 3rd century BC. Cloves were imported into Alexandria as early as 176 AD. By the fourth century AD it was well known in the Mediterranean and by the 8th century, throughout Europe . Today Zanzibar is the leading producer of cloves.

An analysis of clove shows it to consist of carbohydrates moisture, protein, volatile oil, non-volatile ether extract (fat), and crude fiber besides mineral matter, ash insoluble in hydrochloric acid, calcium, phosphorus, iron, sodium, potassium, thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, vitamins C and A. Its calorific value is 430.

The clove buds, stem and leaves, on steam distillation, yield a substantial amount of essential oil. The clove bud oil, derived from the dried buds by steam distillation, contains free eugenol, eugenol acetate and caryophyllene. The stem oil contains more free eugenal than the bud oil, besides eugenol acetate, in small quantity. The leaf oil contains much less of total eugenol than the bud oil and a very small quantity of eugenol acetate.

It is stimulating, carminative, aromatic. It is given as powder or an infusion for –

  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Flatulence
  • Languid indigestion
  • Dyspepsia

The volatile oil contains the medicinal properties and it is strong germicide, antiseptic and a local irritant. It has been used as an expectorant to aid bronchial troubles. Clove oil is often used in association with other medicines.

Have a look at our reference links now…

  1. Clove Oil by Top 10 Uses
  2. Clove by Drugs
  3. Clove Oil by Daily Uses

Clove Oil – Fighter Of Minor/Major Ills

Clove oil is one wonderful essential oil that deals with just about any and every problem and disease that has anything to do with the human body. The oil is very strong and effective and has its users and supporters spread across the globe.

The health benefits of clove oil can be attributed to its antimicrobial, antifungal, antiseptic, antiviral, aphrodisiac and stimulating properties. The oil is used for treating a variety of health disorders including toothaches, indigestion, cough, asthma, headache, stress and blood impurities.

Clove is an evergreen tree, which produces a flower bud that has numerous medicinal properties. It is often referred as clove bud. Clove bud has a shaft and a head and hence it has the Latin name clavus meaning nail. Clove was extensively used in the ancient Indian and Chinese civilizations and it spread to other parts of the world, including Europe, during the seventh and eight centuries.

Clove is rich in minerals such as -

  • Calcium
  • Hydrochloric acid
  • Iron
  • Phosphorus
  • Sodium
  • Potassium
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin C

Clove oil contains the compound eugenol, which has been used in dentistry since numerous years. Gargles with diluted clove oil help in easing the throat. The characteristic smell of clove oil helps in removing bad breath. Clove is also effective against cavities. Traditionally, in India, clove oil was added to a small cotton ball and put at the end of the tooth which has cavity daily before sleeping. The cavity would vanish in a few days. As a result, clove oil is added to numerous dental products and medications, including, mouth wash and tooth pastes. Dentists also mix clove oil with zinc oxide and prepare a white filling material as a temporary alternative to root canal. Take care, clove oil is very strong and can cause burns to your mouth.

Clove oil is aphrodisiac in nature and hence serves as an excellent stress reliever. It has a stimulating effect on the mind and removes mental exhaustion and fatigue. When taken internally, in appropriate amounts, it refreshes the mind. Clove oil also induces sleep and is helpful to insomnia patients. It is useful for treating mental problems such as loss of memory, depression and anxiety.

Clove oil when mixed with salt, and applied on the forehead, gives a cooling effect and helps in getting relief from headache.

Clove oil has a cooling and anti inflammatory effect, and thereby clears the nasal passage. This expectorant is useful in various respiratory disorders including coughs, colds, bronchitis, asthma, sinusitis, and tuberculosis. Chewing a clove bud eases sore throats.

Go through these reference links now -

  1. Clove Oil by Organic Health
  2. Cloves by ehow
  3. Clove by Medicine

Clove Oil – The Antiseptic Wonder

Rarely, essential oils fall in the category of harmless antiseptics and also which are completely warm as far as their job is concerned internally and externally is concerned…

Clove Oil is ‘one’ of the very such oils…Which is a wonderful antiseptic and was indeed used traditionally by our grandmother and great grandmothers for various minor and major problems…

Clove oil is a product derived from the clove tree (Syzygium aromaticum, Eugenia aromaticum, Eugenia caryophyllata; these are all synonymous names for the same plant); the oil can be extracted from any part of the tree including buds, leafs, and twigs. The clove oil commonly sold in drugstores and pharmacies is made from buds. The oil has a high content in eugenol of up to 90 percent.

Eugenol is slightly soluble in water and soluble in organic solvents.

Cloves are used in cooking in small measures and form part of curry mixtures. About half of the yearly production of cloves in Indonesia goes into the production clove cigarettes. Eugenol may be found in other plants as well if in a much lesser percentage. Certain oils and fruits contain good traces of it…

  • Cinnamon
  • Nutmeg
  • Allspice (Jamaica pepper, pimento)
  • Laurel
  • Banana
  • Cherry
  • Basil
  • Anise

Eugenol, and by inference clove oil, has well proven medical uses as a local anaesthetic if applied directly to skin or gums, as an analgesic when swallowed, and as an antiseptic. Commonly, clove oil is used to help with toothache but it may also be used as a treatment for acne, warts, and scars. A study in 2009 proved that eugenol is highly efficient in killing off the reason for acne: Propionibacterium acnes.

The new Australian study now proved that eugenol is highly efficient against scabies. Scabies is a contagious skin infection caused by a parasite. The females of the parasite Sarcoptes scabiei like soft skin to lay their eggs in. They tunnel into the skin and deposit the egg together with their faeces. The skin condition is caused by an allergic reaction to the faeces. Eugenol is able to kill off Sarcoptes scabiei mites and eggs within 15 minutes when applied.

Until now, scabies was treated with a pharmaceutical cream containing the insecticide permethrin against which the mites show an increasing resistance. The treatment with permethrin is a lengthy process and no way nearly as successful as eugenol has proven to be. It requires you to treat the whole skin surface of your body, too.

Alright, go through our reference links now…

  1. Clove Oil by buzzle.com
  2. Clove Oil by Livestrong
  3. Cloves by Miracle

Clove Oil To Rescue

When it comes to humans in distress, there is one essential oil that has the ability to bravely fight all the ills that disturb human existence…Clove Leaf essential oil…

Cloves come from an evergreen tree called Eugenia Caryophyllata. This tree is native to Indonesia, and the dried flower buds are what we know as cloves. The oil is extracted from these buds, and also from the stems and leaves.

Clove has been used as a breath freshener and toothache reliever for centuries. Its ability to stave off disease was known in the ancient world, but why it is effective against illness was not known until bacteria and microbes were discovered. Clove has antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral benefits.

We can still experience clove’s benefits today. Here are some of them -

  • Oral health – Using a solution of diluted clove oil as a gargle or mouthwash is effective against sores in the mouth and/or bad breath.
  • Athlete’s foot – Clove’s pleasant scent and antifungal properties make it a good treatment for athlete’s foot.
  • Tooth and head pain – When diluted with a carrier oil and applied directly to the painful area of the mouth, clove oil numbs pain. Even some commercial preparations intended for oral pain relief contain clove oil. Massaged into the temples, clove oil is also said to relieve headaches.
  • Antiseptic – Diluted clove oil makes a soothing antiseptic ointment for cuts and scrapes. Its antimicrobial properties help prevent infection.
  • Digestion – Clove oil helps treat flatulence and indigestion. When it is added to foods it can help offset some of the negative digestive effects of the food.
  • Cholera – Several sources suggest that this serious disease can be and has been treated effectively with clove oil.

Clove oil should always be diluted with a neutral carrier oil such as almond or olive oil if it is to be used topically. It can be diluted in water for gargles, washes, and other treatments.

Have a look at our reference links…

  1. Clove Oil by Organic Health
  2. Cloves by ehow
  3. Clove by Medicine

Therapeutic Clove Leaf Oil

Clove leaf oil is one such oil that does more good to us than bad, unlike many other therapeutic oils…It is rather warm and comforting in nature…

Clove is a slender evergreen tree up to 39ft high. Its bright green leaves stand in pairs on short stalks. The long buds have a rosy-pinkcorolla at the tip; as the corolla fades the calyx turns red. The whole tree is highly aromatic. The spice was introduced into Europe from the fourth to the sixth century. Believed to be native to Indonesia; now cultivated worldwide, especially in the Philippines, the Molucca Islands and Madagascar.

Other Uses and benefits of Clove

Cloves are used as a table spice and mixed with chilies, cinnamon, turmeric and other spices in the preparation of curry powder. They are also used to flavor the betel quid (pan pati). Clove oil is used in the manufacture of perfumes, soaps, bath salts and as a flavoring agent in medicine and dentistry.

  • Clove bud is a pale yellow liquid with a sweet-spicy odour and a fruity-fresh top note.
  • Clove leaf is a dark brown oil with a crude burnt-woody odour.
  • Clove stem oil is a pale yellow liquid with a strong spicy-wood odour.

Clove oils contain an extremely high proportion of the potentially caustic eugenol. Cloves bud (the preferred oil for aromatherapy): eugenol acetate, caryophllene. Clove leaf: eugenol (up to 90 percent), little or no eugenyl acetate Clove stem: eugenol with other minor constituents.

It has various properties namely –

  • Analgesic
  • Antibiotic
  • Anti-emetic
  • Anti-rheumatic
  • Anti-neuralgic
  • Antispasmodic
  • Antioxidant
  • Antiviral
  • Carminative
  • Expectorant
  • Larvicidal
  • Stimulant
  • Stomachic
  • Vermifugal

The key qualities of Clove leaf oil being -

Tonic,stimulating, revitaliging, aphrodisiac, warming, comforting, puifying, active.

Blends well with…Rose lavender, vanillin, clary sage, bergamot, bay leaf, lavandin, allspice, ylang ylang and cananga.

Though do keep one thing in mind…Use in moderation only in low dilution (less than 1 per cent).

And also, let me not deprive you of the fact that Clove oil is highly irritating to skin and mucous membranes. Therefore, it is advisable for the home user to avoid skin applications and steam inhalations of any type of clove oil. However, it can be used in a vaporizer as a fumigant or room scent.

Okay, go through our reference links now…

  1. Clove Oil by Top 10 Uses
  2. Clove by Drugs
  3. Clove Oil by Daily Uses

Hello Clove Leaf Oil

Ever heard of the overly spiced and therapeutic clove?

Well, if not then let me introduce you to it…And more so to its leaf’s oil, called the clove leaf oil, which has some of the most astonishing benefits for a meager herb…

Clove is a slender evergreen tree up to 39ft high. Its bright green leaves stand in pairs on short stalks. The long buds have a rosy-pinkcorolla at the tip; as the corolla fades the calyx turns red. The whole tree is highly aromatic. The spice was introduced into Europe from the fourth to the sixth century. Believed to be native to Indonesia; now cultivated worldwide, especially in the Philippines, the Molucca Islands and Madagascar. The main oil-producing countries are Madagascar and Indonesia. Clove leaf oil is steam distilled from the leaf of the plant. The medicinal properties reside in the volatile oil. If distilled with water, salt must be added to raise the temperature of ebullition and the same Cloves must be distilled over and over again to get their full essence. The oil is frequently adulterated with fixed oil and oil of Pimento and Copaiba.

All clove oil can cause skin and mucous membrane irritation; clove bud and stem oil may cause dermatitis. Clove bud is the least toxic of the tree oils because of its lower eugenol percentage. Use in moderation only, in low dilution (less then 1 percent).

 

The count of the properties of Clove leaf oil is quite impossible for they are so many, yet still an effort –

  • Anthelmintic
  • Antibiotic
  • Anti-sphrodisiac
  • Emetic
  • Antihistaminic
  • Anti-rheumatic
  • Anti-neuralgic
  • Antioxidant
  • Antiseptic
  • Counterirritant
  • Expectorant
  • Stimulant
  • Spasmolytic
  • Stomachic
  • Vermifuge

bullet   Clove Essential oil Uses – Clove Leaf essential oil, Syzgium aromaticum,  is warming, antiseptic, disinfectant, insect repellent and relieves sore muscles during massage. Blends well with Basil, citrus oils and spice oils. A drop on a surface will kill ants, also makes nice air freshener. It is a strong germicide, a powerful antiseptic, a weak local anaesthetic applied to decayed teeth, and has been used with success as a stimulating expectorant in phthisis and bronchial troubles. Used in dental preparations, and as a fragrance component in toothpastes, soaps, toiletries, cosmetics and perfumes. Extensively employed as a flavour ingredient in major food categories, alcoholic and soft drinks. Used in the production of printing ink, glue and varnish; clove leaf oil is used as the starting material for the isolation of eugenol.

Have a look at our reference links…

  1. Clove Oil by Top 10 Uses
  2. Cove by Drugs
  3. Clove Oil by Daily Uses