Clove Oil – Bigger Benefits

A native of Indonesia and the Malacca Islands, it is an evergreen tree that grows to about 10 meters (30 feet) tall and has bright green leaves and nail-shaped rose-peach flower buds which turn, upon drying, a deep red brown.

Clove oil has a warm, strong, spicy smell and the oil is colorless to pale yellow with a medium to watery viscosity. Clove essential oil is extracted from Eugenia caryophyllata (also known as Syzygium aromaticum, Eugenia aromatica, E. carophyllus) of the Myrtaceae family.

Although clove oil is a very potent oil that should be used with great care in aromatherapy, it does have wonderful properties – from stimulating the mind and lifting depression, to aiding digestion, relieving pain in arthritis and rheumatism, easing respiratory problems and assisting leg ulcers.

These are beaten from the tree and dried. The Latin word ‘Clavus’ means nail shaped, referring to the bud. It was often used by the Greeks, Roman and the Chinese, to ease toothache and as a breath sweetener, especially when talking to the Emperor.

It has antiseptic properties and was used in the prevention of contagious diseases, such as the Plaque. It was an important commodity in the spice trade and is still used in perfumes, mulled wines and liqueurs, love potions, dental products and, stuck in an orange as pomade, an insect repellant.

Clove oil can be used for acne, bruises, burns and cuts, keeping infection at bay and as a pain reliever. It helps with toothache, mouth sores, rheumatism and arthritis. It is beneficial to the digestive system, effective against –

  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Flatulence
  • Spasms and parasites
  • Bad breath

Clove oil is valuable for relieving respiratory problems, like bronchitis, asthma and tuberculosis. The disinfecting property is useful in cases of infectious diseases. Placing a few drops of clove oil on a cotton ball and then placing the cotton ball in a linen cupboard will not only fragrance the cupboard, but will help to keep fish moths at bay. Have a look at our reference links…

  1. Clove Oil by Top 10 Uses
  2. Clove by Drugs
  3. Clove Oil by Daily Uses

Thin Blood Naturally – Clove Oil

Clotting…Blood clotting is a grave condition…Apart from the excruciating pain one goes through, who has any kind of clotting anywhere in the body, this condition can further aggravate the person’s health leading to diseases as chronic and fatal as coronary heart disease…

One thing that a person can do at his personal level to avoid any such mishap is the usage of natural and medically sound herbs and their oils…one of the most illustrious in the field being Clove leaf essential oil…

Clove (Syzygium aromaticum) has a sweet, spicy fragrance that is stimulating and revitalizing. An important ingredient in our Thieves blend due to its wonderful immune-enhancing properties, its principal constituent is eugenol, which is used in the dental industry to numb the gums. Clove is the highest-scoring single ingredient ever tested for its antioxidant capacity on the ORAC scale. Always dilute for topical use. Clove may also be used to enhance the flavor of foods.

The best part about clove being that the benefits of it are not confined to mere clotting or minor aches…but they spread much beyond that…

For dietary, aromatic or topical use. When using as a supplement, dilute one drop in 4 fl. oz. of vegetable oil and put into capsule. Then take one capsule before each meal or as desired.

Possible skin sensitivity. If pregnant or under a doctor’s care, consult your physician. Check with your health care provider if taking a blood-thinning medication. Always dilute before applying to the skin or taking internally. Keep out of reach of children.

Clove oil is 60 to 90% eugenol, which is the source of its antifungal, anesthetic and antiseptic properties. Laboratory test have shown that eugenol exhibited marked antifungal activity. They also confirmed cloves’ effectiveness in inhibiting food-borne pathogens as well as other bacteria. Eugenol is also found in -

  • Cinnamon
  • Sage
  • Oregano

Capsaicin is also present in cloves, which is the active ingredient in cayenne pepper.

The clove is an evergreen tree, called Eugenia arena, reaching a height of 15 to 30 feet tall. It is native to the Spice Islands and the Philippines but also grown in India, Sumatra, Jamaica, the West Indies, Brazil, and other tropical areas. The bark is pale yellowish gray in color and smooth. It has opposite ovate (egg-shaped) leaves 3-6 inches long. Its flowers, are red and white, bell-shaped, and grow in clusters. The flowers when gathered are at first of a reddish color, but on drying they assume a deep brown cast. The familiar clove used in the kitchen is the dried flower bud.

Check out our reference links now…

  1. Clove Oil by Emergency
  2. Cloves by care2.com
  3. Essential Oils by Organic Facts

Clove Leaf Oil Properties

Clove oil is illustrious in the world for its various healing and benefitting properties, most of which are far from our awareness…Read out some…

Clove is the dried unopened flower bud obtained from a handsome, middle-sized, evergreen tree. The tree has a straight trunk and grows upto a height of 10 to 12 meters.

The dove has been used in India and China , for over 2,000 years, as a spice to check both tooth decay and counter halitosis that is bad breath. In Persia and China, it was considered to have aphrodisiac properties.

The clove tree is a native of the Molucca islands. The Chinese obtained this spice by the 3rd century BC. Cloves were imported into Alexandria as early as 176 AD. By the fourth century AD it was well known in the Mediterranean and by the 8th century, throughout Europe . Today Zanzibar is the leading producer of cloves.

An analysis of clove shows it to consist of carbohydrates moisture, protein, volatile oil, non-volatile ether extract (fat), and crude fiber besides mineral matter, ash insoluble in hydrochloric acid, calcium, phosphorus, iron, sodium, potassium, thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, vitamins C and A. Its calorific value is 430.

The clove buds, stem and leaves, on steam distillation, yield a substantial amount of essential oil. The clove bud oil, derived from the dried buds by steam distillation, contains free eugenol, eugenol acetate and caryophyllene. The stem oil contains more free eugenal than the bud oil, besides eugenol acetate, in small quantity. The leaf oil contains much less of total eugenol than the bud oil and a very small quantity of eugenol acetate.

It is stimulating, carminative, aromatic. It is given as powder or an infusion for –

  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Flatulence
  • Languid indigestion
  • Dyspepsia

The volatile oil contains the medicinal properties and it is strong germicide, antiseptic and a local irritant. It has been used as an expectorant to aid bronchial troubles. Clove oil is often used in association with other medicines.

Have a look at our reference links now…

  1. Clove Oil by Top 10 Uses
  2. Clove by Drugs
  3. Clove Oil by Daily Uses