Thin Blood Naturally – Clove Oil

Clotting…Blood clotting is a grave condition…Apart from the excruciating pain one goes through, who has any kind of clotting anywhere in the body, this condition can further aggravate the person’s health leading to diseases as chronic and fatal as coronary heart disease…

One thing that a person can do at his personal level to avoid any such mishap is the usage of natural and medically sound herbs and their oils…one of the most illustrious in the field being Clove leaf essential oil…

Clove (Syzygium aromaticum) has a sweet, spicy fragrance that is stimulating and revitalizing. An important ingredient in our Thieves blend due to its wonderful immune-enhancing properties, its principal constituent is eugenol, which is used in the dental industry to numb the gums. Clove is the highest-scoring single ingredient ever tested for its antioxidant capacity on the ORAC scale. Always dilute for topical use. Clove may also be used to enhance the flavor of foods.

The best part about clove being that the benefits of it are not confined to mere clotting or minor aches…but they spread much beyond that…

For dietary, aromatic or topical use. When using as a supplement, dilute one drop in 4 fl. oz. of vegetable oil and put into capsule. Then take one capsule before each meal or as desired.

Possible skin sensitivity. If pregnant or under a doctor’s care, consult your physician. Check with your health care provider if taking a blood-thinning medication. Always dilute before applying to the skin or taking internally. Keep out of reach of children.

Clove oil is 60 to 90% eugenol, which is the source of its antifungal, anesthetic and antiseptic properties. Laboratory test have shown that eugenol exhibited marked antifungal activity. They also confirmed cloves’ effectiveness in inhibiting food-borne pathogens as well as other bacteria. Eugenol is also found in -

  • Cinnamon
  • Sage
  • Oregano

Capsaicin is also present in cloves, which is the active ingredient in cayenne pepper.

The clove is an evergreen tree, called Eugenia arena, reaching a height of 15 to 30 feet tall. It is native to the Spice Islands and the Philippines but also grown in India, Sumatra, Jamaica, the West Indies, Brazil, and other tropical areas. The bark is pale yellowish gray in color and smooth. It has opposite ovate (egg-shaped) leaves 3-6 inches long. Its flowers, are red and white, bell-shaped, and grow in clusters. The flowers when gathered are at first of a reddish color, but on drying they assume a deep brown cast. The familiar clove used in the kitchen is the dried flower bud.

Check out our reference links now…

  1. Clove Oil by Emergency
  2. Cloves by care2.com
  3. Essential Oils by Organic Facts

Therapeutic Clove Leaf Oil

Clove leaf oil is one such oil that does more good to us than bad, unlike many other therapeutic oils…It is rather warm and comforting in nature…

Clove is a slender evergreen tree up to 39ft high. Its bright green leaves stand in pairs on short stalks. The long buds have a rosy-pinkcorolla at the tip; as the corolla fades the calyx turns red. The whole tree is highly aromatic. The spice was introduced into Europe from the fourth to the sixth century. Believed to be native to Indonesia; now cultivated worldwide, especially in the Philippines, the Molucca Islands and Madagascar.

Other Uses and benefits of Clove

Cloves are used as a table spice and mixed with chilies, cinnamon, turmeric and other spices in the preparation of curry powder. They are also used to flavor the betel quid (pan pati). Clove oil is used in the manufacture of perfumes, soaps, bath salts and as a flavoring agent in medicine and dentistry.

  • Clove bud is a pale yellow liquid with a sweet-spicy odour and a fruity-fresh top note.
  • Clove leaf is a dark brown oil with a crude burnt-woody odour.
  • Clove stem oil is a pale yellow liquid with a strong spicy-wood odour.

Clove oils contain an extremely high proportion of the potentially caustic eugenol. Cloves bud (the preferred oil for aromatherapy): eugenol acetate, caryophllene. Clove leaf: eugenol (up to 90 percent), little or no eugenyl acetate Clove stem: eugenol with other minor constituents.

It has various properties namely –

  • Analgesic
  • Antibiotic
  • Anti-emetic
  • Anti-rheumatic
  • Anti-neuralgic
  • Antispasmodic
  • Antioxidant
  • Antiviral
  • Carminative
  • Expectorant
  • Larvicidal
  • Stimulant
  • Stomachic
  • Vermifugal

The key qualities of Clove leaf oil being -

Tonic,stimulating, revitaliging, aphrodisiac, warming, comforting, puifying, active.

Blends well with…Rose lavender, vanillin, clary sage, bergamot, bay leaf, lavandin, allspice, ylang ylang and cananga.

Though do keep one thing in mind…Use in moderation only in low dilution (less than 1 per cent).

And also, let me not deprive you of the fact that Clove oil is highly irritating to skin and mucous membranes. Therefore, it is advisable for the home user to avoid skin applications and steam inhalations of any type of clove oil. However, it can be used in a vaporizer as a fumigant or room scent.

Okay, go through our reference links now…

  1. Clove Oil by Top 10 Uses
  2. Clove by Drugs
  3. Clove Oil by Daily Uses

Healing Herb – Clove Leaf Oil

Various herbs are present on earth that have innumerable healing qualities…and Clove leaf oil being one of them…The oils has the ability to heal and benefit us to great extents…

Cloves have many medicinal virtues. They are stimulant. They are useful in counteracting spasmodic disorders and in relieving flatulence. They help stimulate sluggish circulation and thereby promote digestion and metabolism. In the Indian system of medicine, cloves are used in various conditions either in the form of a powder or a decoction made from them. Clove oil contains ingredients that help stabilize blood circulation and regulate body temperature. Clove oil, applied outwardly, has stimulating effects on the skin, producing heat and redness.

Digestive Disorders

Cloves promote enzymatic flow and boost digestive functioning. They are used in various forms of gastric irritability and dyspepsia. Licking the powder of fried cloves mixed with honey is effective in controlling vomiting. The anesthetic action of clove numbs the- gullet and stomach and stops vomiting.

Cholera

Cloves are very useful for treating cholera. About 4 grams of cloves are boiled in 3 litres of water until half the water has evaporated. This water, taken in draughts, will check severe symptoms of the disease.

Asthma

Clove is an effective remedy for asthma. A teaspoon of decoction prepared by boiling 6 cloves in 30 ml of water can be taken with honey thrice daily as an expectorant.

Teeth Disorders

The use of a clove in toothache decreases pain. It also helps to decrease infection due to its antiseptic properties. Clove oil, applied to a cavity in a decayed tooth, also relieves toothache.

Earache

A clove sauted in a teaspoon of sesame ( til) oil and 3 to 5 drops of this (warm) oil put into the ear can cure earache.

Muscular Cramps

Muscular cramps are often relieved when the oil of clove is applied as a poultice near the affected portion.

Headaches

A paste of clove and salt crystals in milk is a common household remedy for headaches. Salt, as a hygroscopic agent, absorbs fluid and decreases tension.

Stye

Clove is one of the best remedies for styes which is an inflammation around the eyelash. A clove stub rubbed in water and then applied over the stye gives relief.

How about you check out our reference links now…

  1. Clove Oil by Top 10 Uses
  2. Clove by Drugs
  3. Clove Oil by Daily Uses

Clove Leaf Oil Properties

Clove oil is illustrious in the world for its various healing and benefitting properties, most of which are far from our awareness…Read out some…

Clove is the dried unopened flower bud obtained from a handsome, middle-sized, evergreen tree. The tree has a straight trunk and grows upto a height of 10 to 12 meters.

The dove has been used in India and China , for over 2,000 years, as a spice to check both tooth decay and counter halitosis that is bad breath. In Persia and China, it was considered to have aphrodisiac properties.

The clove tree is a native of the Molucca islands. The Chinese obtained this spice by the 3rd century BC. Cloves were imported into Alexandria as early as 176 AD. By the fourth century AD it was well known in the Mediterranean and by the 8th century, throughout Europe . Today Zanzibar is the leading producer of cloves.

An analysis of clove shows it to consist of carbohydrates moisture, protein, volatile oil, non-volatile ether extract (fat), and crude fiber besides mineral matter, ash insoluble in hydrochloric acid, calcium, phosphorus, iron, sodium, potassium, thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, vitamins C and A. Its calorific value is 430.

The clove buds, stem and leaves, on steam distillation, yield a substantial amount of essential oil. The clove bud oil, derived from the dried buds by steam distillation, contains free eugenol, eugenol acetate and caryophyllene. The stem oil contains more free eugenal than the bud oil, besides eugenol acetate, in small quantity. The leaf oil contains much less of total eugenol than the bud oil and a very small quantity of eugenol acetate.

It is stimulating, carminative, aromatic. It is given as powder or an infusion for –

  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Flatulence
  • Languid indigestion
  • Dyspepsia

The volatile oil contains the medicinal properties and it is strong germicide, antiseptic and a local irritant. It has been used as an expectorant to aid bronchial troubles. Clove oil is often used in association with other medicines.

Have a look at our reference links now…

  1. Clove Oil by Top 10 Uses
  2. Clove by Drugs
  3. Clove Oil by Daily Uses